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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Brad Smith
General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Microsoft
KQED 12/09/2013
Smith: Well for many years, we have been responding to subpoenas, to warrants, to court orders. we, of course, know what we have been doing. but frankly, what really surprised people across the tech sector was at the end of october,
Brad Smith
General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Microsoft
KQED 12/09/2013
Smith: But it's an issue of broad importance to the public. Everybody should be concerned about the balance being struck between protecting safety on the one hand which with is obviously important. and protecting our fundamental freedoms and rights to privacy as well. So as important as private discussions are, this is too important to leave to private discussion alone.
Brad Smith
General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Microsoft
KQED 12/09/2013
Smith: Certainly we realized as an industry that there are more governments and this is not confined to any single country, that are seeking to hack their way or tap into cables and collect data. So here at Microsoft, but really across our industry, companies increasingly are taking steps. We’re increasing encryption that in effect puts everything in code when it's going across the cable, for example, so the government cannot read, necessarily what it might be getting.
Brad Smith
General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Microsoft
KQED 12/09/2013
Smith: We need clear laws. We need the kind of transparency so the public knows how these laws are being applied. We need to recognize that as important as public safety clearly is, we also have important constitutional freedoms, the right to speak, the right to be secure from unreasonable government searches. All of which are at stake. This is a matter for the public at large to decide through our elective processes.
Cheryl Casone
Anchor on FOX Business News and Host of
FBC 12/10/2013
Casone: Arizona could become the first U.S. state to regulate, potentially prevent the NSA from spying on residents. A State Senator has proposed a law that would stop state and local law-enforcement from giving any material or support at all to the NSA and it would also make any evidence obtained in these activities inadmissible in court cases.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: it's reportedly gathering information -- or communications information from online gaming sites. The stories suggest the activities are directed abroad. We know the NSA was making plans to obtain cell site location information under section 215. We also know that the NSA engaged in bulk collection of internet meta data under the FISA PEN Register statute.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: It suggests to me under that kind of legal interpretation of FISA the NSA could collect the same massive amounts of information domestically that this recent stories suggests they're collecting abroad.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: But under the current law, 90 would the NSA be able to restart the bulk collection of internet data? Litt: if the nsa and the department of justice were able to make a showing to the FISA court that the collection of internet meta data in bulk, which, of course, is a category of information that's not protected by the fourth amendment, that if it were relevant to an authorized investigation and could convince the FISA court of that, then, yes, it would be authorized.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: So to restart the bulk collection of internet data, would you have to go to the court? Litt: I believe we would. Leahy: Mr. Cole? Cole: Yes, Mr. Chairman. Under the FISA statute, i think you would have to get court authority just like you would under 215 to be able to do that. And that would only last for a period of time. it would have to be renewed periodically. there's no active authority for it right now.
Patrick Leahy
U.S. Senator (D- Vermont), Judiciary Committee Chairman
CSPAN 12/11/2013
Leahy: The FISA pen register statute authorize you to obtain all internet meta data, not just e-mail meta data? Cole: I think that is correct. Again, it would be limited to the meta data in that regard.
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